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Surga-Neraka_Pahala-Dosa

_R0A6177

 

Apa yang saya percayai adalah, setiap perintah dan larangan dari Alloh, semuanya itu memanusiakan manusia. Membuat batasan agar manusia tetap pada koridor yang benar, baik itu dalam menjalin hubungan dengan sesama atau terhadap Tuhan.

Ketika aturan Tuhan dilanggar, terjadi berbagai penyimpangan yang menimbulkan masalah.

Tuhan Maha Penyayang, Dia menciptakan konsep surga dan neraka, pahala dan dosa, agar manusia termotivasi, terdorong untuk selalu menaati perintah-Nya dan larangan-Nya. Sesungguhnya jikalaupun neraka dan surga tidak ada, pahala dan dosa tidak ada. Konsekuensi dari melakukan perintah dan menaati larangan-Nya pasti ada.

Umat Islam sangat beruntung, aturan sudah disediakan, tidak perlu lagi dibuat. Bagian paling susah adalah menaatinya.

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Transitive or intransitive; Countable or uncountable – what does it all mean??

About Words - Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog

by Liz Walter

RonTech2000/iStock/Getty Images Plus RonTech2000/iStock/Getty Images Plus

It’s all very well being told that we use many in front of countable plural nouns and much before uncountable nouns, but what happens if you don’t know what ‘countable’ and ‘uncountable’ mean? People like me, who write about language, use these terms all the time but why should we assume that our readers know them? After all, they are quite technical, and most people in the street wouldn’t know their meaning. That’s why I thought we’d take a step back this week and look at a few really basic terms that help learners understand language.

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Head over heels! (Love idioms)

oh love, I love you

About Words - Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog

by Kate Woodford

LWA/Dann Tardiff/Blend Images/Getty LWA/Dann Tardiff/Blend Images/Getty

With Valentine’s Day almost upon us, our attention at About Words has turned to love, or more specifically, the various phrases and idioms that we use to describe romantic love. If love is on your mind, read on…

We’ll begin this post with the start of romantic love. When you fall in love, you start to love someone romantically: They met in the spring of 2009 and fell madly in love.

If you start to love someone from the first time you see them, you may describe the experience as love at first sightAl and I met in a friend’s kitchen and it was love at first sight for both of us.

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Head over heels! (Love idioms)

oh love, I love you

About Words - Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog

by Kate Woodford

LWA/Dann Tardiff/Blend Images/Getty LWA/Dann Tardiff/Blend Images/Getty

With Valentine’s Day almost upon us, our attention at About Words has turned to love, or more specifically, the various phrases and idioms that we use to describe romantic love. If love is on your mind, read on…

We’ll begin this post with the start of romantic love. When you fall in love, you start to love someone romantically: They met in the spring of 2009 and fell madly in love.

If you start to love someone from the first time you see them, you may describe the experience as love at first sightAl and I met in a friend’s kitchen and it was love at first sight for both of us.

View original post 316 more words

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5 Phrasal verbs to impress your teachers

About Words - Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog

KUO CHUN HUNG/iStock/Getty KUO CHUN HUNG/iStock/Getty

Many of my students worry about phrasal verbs, and I have written several posts about them, including a basic introduction to the what they are and how they are used and a more recent post on phrasal verbs for everyday actions.

One of the most common complaints is that there are simply so many of them, and that they are difficult to remember, especially when the main verb is a very common one such as take or set. In this post, therefore, I have selected just 5 phrasal verbs. All of them are extremely common, and all of them can be used in a wide variety of contexts. If you learn just these 5, you will be able to use them in your writing and impress your teachers.

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Three for a quid: talking about money

price price price

About Words - Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog

by Liz Walter​
threeforaquid
When teaching an intermediate class recently, I was surprised to find that very few of the students (who were from various parts of the world) knew how to say prices, so this blog will explain this very basic function and also look at some other vocabulary connected with money.

First, the prices. There is more than one correct way to say a price, but the most common one is simply to say the number of pounds followed by the number of pence (or the number of dollars followed by the number of cents):

£3.50 ‘Three fifty’

$4.95 ‘Four ninety five’

Sometimes we also say the words pounds, pence, dollars, or cents in the price. There is no difference, and neither way is better or worse. In American English, if you use these words, you have to say and in the middle. In British English…

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Are you a glass-half-full person? (Everyday Idioms)

About Words - Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog

by Kate Woodford
glass-half-full
A reader of this blog recently asked for a post on idioms that are used in everyday English. This seemed like a reasonable request. After all, if you are going to make the effort to learn a set of English idioms, you want those idioms to be useful. The question, then, was how to decide which idioms to write about. There are a great number of idioms in the English language, but some are rarely used. In the end, I decided to keep an idioms diary for a week, and make a note of any idioms that I heard people use in conversation. From this set of idioms, I chose a few that I considered to be common in contemporary, conversational English and have presented them here.

Early in the week, a radio presenter told his colleague that she was ‘opening up a can of…

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